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TIFF Day 3: The King’s Speech & Made in Dagenham

12 September 2010 No Comment

THE KINGS SPEECH
12:00pm, Ryerson Theatre.

Although I didn’t get up until after ten o’clock this morning it still felt like a very early morning, because of last nights midnight madness, I didn’t get to bed until after 3am. Luckily, Ahli let me stay at her place, just a few blocks from Ryerson, so I didn’t have to worry too much about getting up early to catch The King’s Speech by Noon. However, I did manage to somehow sleep through my alarm (but only by 20min). Once I arrived to the theatre I very much noticed the lack of Press and Red Carpet, so was mildly disappointed to think that none of the stars would be on hand. Luckily I was wrong.

This is story of King George VI (Elizabeth IIs Father), and on the surface, it is about him suffering and overcoming a speech impediment. Sounds weak, I know, but it’s really more about pressures of his role, the stress and oddity of his ascension to the throne, and most of all, of the fantastic bond between him and one if his best friends, who just happened to be his speech therapist. Colin Firth is delightful as ever (while, to be fair, I could watch him read Hungarian poetry and find it brilliant),as is Geoffrey Rush, who takes on a rather mild, ‘normal’ role for once.



(Does this need a caption? I love older British Men so much!)
(YES I know that Geoffery Rush is Australian, but still!)

I’ll never not remember Colin Firth, during the Q&A, on what attracted him to the movie, saying in his lovely British brogue the phrase “Bromance”!

MADE IN DAGENHAM
6:00pm, VISA Screening Room (Elgin Theatre).

I love evening Visa Screening room movies, because I almost always get to go into the Visa Lounge and eat free chocolates. Plus, hey have a cash bar and tonight I decided to have a beer, and tea (a combination which puzzled my friend Bhilly to no end). So much better than having to wait outside, it’s a small but lovely perk I look forward to every year.



(Me and Ahli in the Visa Lounge 2010!)

This is one of those quirky British films that middle aged women will be falling over themselves to see, and rightly so. It really has Calendar Girls written all over it (same Director), only with a bit more far reaching message and result. The story of a small group of women who started the movement for equal pay for women in factories around the UK. Every actress in this movie was fantastic. From Sally Hawkins as the lead, or her many supporting female clan. Bob Hoskins was good too, however I think the screenwriter forgot about his character somewhere around the half way point, which is a shame.

Before the film it was introduced by two of the producers, one of which (Elizabeth Karlsen) advised that she recently found out about the Bechdel Test for movies, and boasted that Made in Dagenham passed with flying colours. That, it did.



(Aforementioned Producers & Sally Hawkins [Taken by Ahli!])


(Jaime Winstone and Rosamund Pike)

See all my pictures from today at my TIFF ’10 Day 3 Photo Set on Flickr.

~Chantelle
(@ChantelleJoytwt)
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